Europe


Lakhta Tower in Saint Petersburg

AT THE TOP IN EUROPE

Tall, taller, tallest: That is the name of the game in high-rise construction today, and the new Lakhta (Lachta) Center in Saint Petersburg is no different. The Headquarters of Gazprom is already Europe’s tallest building.

The multi-purpose premises with 400,000 square meters of usable space under construction since October 2012 will be at the heart of the Gazprom Group headquarters. A significant amount of space is reserved for public and recreational infrastructure. The Lakhta Center high-rise will become the new landmark of Saint Petersburg and, standing at 462 meters, will become the tallest building in Europe. The tallest of the total of 87 floors will sit at 372 meters up. The scenic terrace will provide an impressive panoramic view of the city of Saint Petersburg and the Baltic Sea, as will the views from the panoramic restaurant at 315 meters. The tower overtook the former European frontrunner, the Federation Tower in Moscow (374 meters) in October. The tower has already been breaking records before its completion, which is scheduled for 2018 – specifically when concrete was poured for the Tower foundation in early 2015. It set a new world record for the largest uninterrupted concrete structure, even making its way into the Guinness Book of old Records. The sheer number of the prestigious building’s total 102 elevators to built is also impressive. Gustav Wolf has already successfully completed an initial order for PAWO F10 wire rope (19 mm) for its customer Schindler.

The Lakhta Center will top out at 90 meters taller
than the former European frontrunner.


Berlin Palace

The Berlin Palace embodies the varied cultural and political history of the German capital like few other buildings. The reconstructed building, which should be completed in 2019, will also use Gustav Wolf products.

The Berlin Palace was the dominating structure in the historic center of Berlin and was considered a magnum opus of the baroque style. Build in 1442 as the residential Palace of the House of Hollenzollern, it was later enlarged and served as the imperial residence for the German Empire from 1871. During the Second World War, the Palace suffered fire damage down to the northwest wing in February 1945. In the former GDR, this unique cultural landmark ultimately underwent controlled explosions in sections starting in September 1950. The Palace of the Republic took its place in 1976. But history famously made its own way: It was decided to rebuild the former palace with the aim of restoring the historic Berlin skyline. The groundbreaking ceremony for the Humboldt Forum was held on June 12, 2013. The took the former European frontrunner, the Federation Tower in Moscow (374 meters) in October. The tower has already been breaking records before its completion, which is scheduled for 2018 – specifically when concrete was poured for the Tower foundation in early 2015. It set a new world record for the largest uninterrupted concrete structure, even making its way into the Guinness Book of World Records. The sheer number of the prestigious building’s total 102 elevators to built is also impressive. Gustav Wolf has already successfully completed an initial order for PAWO F10 wire rope (19 mm) for its customer Schindler. The roofing ceremony for the completed Shell construction of the palace, complete with the roof framework, was held on June 12, 2015. Gustav Wolf has contributed to the successful “total package” with a number of different products: Some 6,200 meters of PAWO F7S (8 mm) were delivered for 21 units, as well as more than 240 rope suspensions. All of the elevators are slated for completion by summer 2018.

The Berlin Palace is scheduled to be officially opened on September 14, 2019 after six-and-a-half years of
construction.


Turning Torso

turning-torso-luft_150_09Gustav Wolf Elevator Ropes for the highest skyscraper in Scandinavia

Turning Torso is the name of the highest skyscraper in Scandinavia and the second highest residential building in Europe. Its inauguration took place in Malmö, Sweden, on 27th August, 2005. The construction costs totaled 168 Million Euros. The skyscraper comprises 57 floors with a height of 190 meters. The whole site comprises a floor space of approximately 21,500 m² for offices and apartments. A total of 5 elevators, equipped with Gustav Wolf elevator ropes and operating at a speed of 5 m/s ( 18 km/h ), are available for the employees and residents. During the 3-year construction period, the engineers faced considerable challenges due to the extraordinary architecture, and with our partner KONE we were able to resolve them all. The construction of the torso is based on the design of a sculpture by the Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, the so-called “Twisting Torso” figure. The edifice consists of nine cubes which are composed of five floors each and an interim floor. Every level is offset by approximately 1.6° from the level below. Thus, the building offsets by 90° over the whole height. When looking at the tower, the viewer tends to believe that it rotates along its axis.


 

a50380b3b5Highlight Towers München

The Highlight Towers have dominated Munich city centre since 2004. With a height of 126 metres and 113 metres respectively, the office complex is the second tallest building in the Bavarian metropolis. The multi-storey buildings have office space on 33 and 28 floors respectively and are connected by a set of twin bridges made of glass and steel on the 9th and 10th floors as well as a single bridge on the 20th floor.

 


 

Kulturpalast, Warschau

a0b271dd87The building was constructed in 1955 and was a present from the then Soviet Union. There are many cinemas, theatres and museums across the 42 floors. Today, many television and radio stations use the aerial. The Palace of Culture, which is a listed building, is still the tallest building in Poland today; at the time of construction it was even the second largest building in Europe at 237 metres high.